Original Research

Conjoint alcohol and tobacco use among tuberculosis patients in public primary healthcare in South Africa

Karl Peltzer
South African Journal of Psychiatry | Vol 20, No 1 | a482 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/sajpsychiatry.v20i1.482 | © 2014 Karl Peltzer | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 05 August 2013 | Published: 30 April 2014

About the author(s)

Karl Peltzer, HIV/AIDS, STI and TB (HAST) Research Programme, Human Sciences Research Council, Pretoria, South Africa; Department of Psychology, University of Limpopo, Turfloop, South Africa; ASEAN Institute for Health Development, Madidol University, Salaya, Phutthamonthon, Nakhonpathom, Thailand

Full Text:

PDF (643KB)

Abstract

Objective. To determine the prevalence of, and factors associated with conjoint alcohol and tobacco use among tuberculosis (TB) patients in South Africa (SA).

Methods. In a cross-sectional survey, 4 900 (54.5% men, 45.5% women) consecutively selected TB patients (including new TB and new TB retreatment patients) from 42 public primary care clinics in three districts in SA were assessed using various measures (including those for alcohol and tobacco use), within one month of anti-TB treatment.

Results. Overall, 10.1% (15.5% among men; 3.4% among women) were conjointly hazardous, harmful or dependent alcohol users and daily or almost-daily tobacco users. The proportion of daily or almost-daily tobacco users among hazardous, harmful or dependent alcohol users was 48.9%, (53.3% among men; 26.4% among women). Those with hazardous, harmful or dependent alcohol use had significantly higher odds of having anxiety and/or depression (odds ratio (OR) 1.37; confidence interval (CI) 1.13 - 1.65) and exhibiting daily or almost-daily tobacco use (OR 5.94; CI 4.33 - 5.87). The mean ± standard deviation alcohol use disorders identification test (AUDIT) score among conjoint hazardous, harmful or dependent alcohol users and daily or almost-daily tobacco users was significantly higher (17.1±6.1) than among hazardous, harmful or dependent alcohol users who were not current tobacco users (15.4±5.6) (p<0.001). In multivariate analysis, male gender, coloured ethnicity, lower education and greater poverty, TB retreatment patient status and non-adherence to anti-TB medication were associated with a greater risk for conjoint alcohol and tobacco use.

Conclusions. A high prevalence and several risk factors for conjoint alcohol and tobacco use were found among TB patients. The findings of this study call for dual-intervention approaches to alcohol and tobacco use.


Keywords

hazardous, harmful, or dependent alcohol use; daily tobacco use; dual substance use; tuberculosis patients; public primary care; South Africa

Metrics

Total abstract views: 3199
Total article views: 1121

 

Crossref Citations

1. Effect of a brief motivational interview and text message intervention targeting tobacco smoking, alcohol use and medication adherence to improve tuberculosis treatment outcomes in adult patients with tuberculosis: a multicentre, randomised controlled trial of the ProLife programme in South Africa
Goedele Louwagie, Mona Kanaan, Neo Keitumetse Morojele, Andre Van Zyl, Andrew Stephen Moriarty, Jinshuo Li, Kamran Siddiqi, Astrid Turner, Noreen Dadirai Mdege, Olufemi Babatunde Omole, John Tumbo, Max Bachmann, Steve Parrott, Olalekan A Ayo-Yusuf
BMJ Open  vol: 12  issue: 2  first page: e056496  year: 2022  
doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2021-056496