Original Research

Prevalence and correlates of depression among Nigerian stroke survivors

Olushola Olibamoyo, Abiodun Adewuya, Bolanle Ola, Olurotimi Coker, Olayinka Atilola
South African Journal of Psychiatry | Vol 25 | a1252 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/sajpsychiatry.v25i0.1252 | © 2019 | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 21 July 2018 | Published: 20 May 2019

About the author(s)

Olushola Olibamoyo, Department of Psychiatry, Lagos State University Teaching Hospital, Lagos, Nigeria
Abiodun Adewuya, Department of Behavioural Medicine, Lagos State University College of Medicine, Lagos, Nigeria
Bolanle Ola, Department of Behavioural Medicine, Lagos State University College of Medicine, Lagos, Nigeria
Olurotimi Coker, Department of Behavioural Medicine, Lagos State University College of Medicine, Lagos, Nigeria
Olayinka Atilola, Department of Behavioural Medicine, Lagos State University College of Medicine, Lagos, Nigeria


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Abstract

Background: There is mixed evidence for the hypothesis that the risk of depression after stroke is influenced by the location of lesions in the hemispheres, demographic and clinical factors, and disability of stroke survivors.

Aim: The current study determined the prevalence of depression and its socio-demographic and clinico-pathological correlates among stroke survivors in a tertiary hospital in Lagos, Nigeria.

Method: The cross-sectional study was carried out among 112 adult patients with a clinical history of stroke confirmed by neuroimaging. Depression was diagnosed using Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. The socio-demographic profile was obtained, and cognitive impairment was assessed using the Mini-Mental State Examination. Stroke severity was assessed retrospectively using the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale and current disability was measured using the Modified Rankin Scale.

Results: There were 48 (42.9%) stroke survivors with a clinical diagnosis of depression. Using binary logistic regression, the independent determinants of depression were younger age, unemployment, perceived poor social support, increasing number of previous admissions because of stroke, cognitive impairment, severity of stroke and current disability status. However, there was no significant association between depression and lesion location.

Conclusion: Depression is a common associate of stroke, and there is a need for sustained focus on young stroke survivors with severe stroke, especially those who do not have social support and have low socio-economic status, who may have a higher risk of developing depression following stroke.


Keywords

Post-Stroke depression; Lesion location; Stroke severity; Disability; Socio-demographic; Clinical factors

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