Original Research

Features of residency training and psychological distress among residents in a Nigerian teaching hospital

Oluyomi Esan, Adewunmi Adeoye, Paul Onakoya, Olarewalu Opeodu, Kola Owonikoko, Dare Ogunlana, Mojisola Bello, Akin Adeyemo, Lanre Onigbogi, Olusola Idowu, Tolulope Akute
South African Journal of Psychiatry | Vol 20, No 2 | a426 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/sajpsychiatry.v20i2.426 | © 2014 Oluyomi Esan, Adewunmi Adeoye, Paul Onakoya, Olarewalu Opeodu, Kola Owonikoko, Dare Ogunlana, Mojisola Bello, Akin Adeyemo, Lanre Onigbogi, Olusola Idowu, Tolulope Akute | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 30 December 2012 | Published: 30 July 2014

About the author(s)

Oluyomi Esan, Department of Psychiatry, University of Ibadan, Nigeria, Nigeria
Adewunmi Adeoye, Department of Pathology, University of Ibadan, Nigeria, Nigeria
Paul Onakoya, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Ibadan, Nigeria, Nigeria
Olarewalu Opeodu, Department of Peridontal and Community Dentistry, University of Ibadan, Nigeria, Nigeria
Kola Owonikoko, Department of Obstretics and Gynaecology, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomoso, Nigeria, Nigeria
Dare Ogunlana, Department of Surgery, University of Ibadan, Nigeria, Nigeria
Mojisola Bello, Department of Radiology, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria, Nigeria
Akin Adeyemo, Institute of Child Health, University of Ibadan, Nigeria, Nigeria
Lanre Onigbogi, Department of Community Medicine, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria, Nigeria
Olusola Idowu, Reddington Multispecialist Hospital, Victoria Island, Lagos, Nigeria, Nigeria
Tolulope Akute, Department of Obstretics and Gynaecology, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria, Nigeria

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Abstract

Background. Resident doctors at University College Hospital (UCH), Ibadan, Nigeria, made a series of complaints about inadequate con­sultant supervision, lack of structure in the training programme and excessive workload. These complaints led to an evaluation of residency training. 

Objective. To investigate perceptions of the residency training programme and levels of psychological distress among residents.

Methods. All 250 resident doctors at UCH were invited to complete questionnaires about their residency training and general health as part of a cross-sectional study. Data were analysed using SPSS 16. 

Results. A total of 128 residents (51.2%) responded to the questionnaire. Of the respondents, 72% rated their consultant supervision as good and 82.6% rated support from nurses as good; 61.8% had <5 hours of formal educational activities and 65.1% had <5 hours of research or private study per week. There was evidence of psychological distress in 48.4% of the respondents, and there was a significant association between psychological distress and the intensity of work (p<0.01). 

Conclusion. The residency training programme at UCH appears to prioritise service provision over research and education activities. Residents who report high workloads also have high levels of psychological distress. Tackling these issues could improve overall satisfaction with residency training and reduce complaints. 

 

Keywords

Residency training; Resident; Nigeria; Teaching hospital

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