Original Research

Mild hypoxia is associated with quantitative EEG changes, but not with dissociative symptoms

H W Smith, C Kruger, C le Roux, M J van der Linde, H T Groeneveld, P Bartel, F Pretorius
South African Journal of Psychiatry | Vol 12, No 2 | a61 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/sajpsychiatry.v12i2.61 | © 2006 H W Smith, C Kruger, C le Roux, M J van der Linde, H T Groeneveld, P Bartel, F Pretorius | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 03 March 2008 | Published: 01 June 2006

About the author(s)

H W Smith, Department of Psychiatry, University of Pretoria, South Africa
C Kruger, Department of Psychiatry, University of Pretoria, South Africa
C le Roux, Department of Aerospace and Baromedicine, University of Pretoria, South Africa
M J van der Linde, Department of Statistics, University of Pretoria, South Africa
H T Groeneveld, Department of Statistics, University of Pretoria, South Africa
P Bartel, Department of Neurology, University of Pretoria
F Pretorius, Department of Psychiatry, University of Pretoria, South Africa

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Abstract

Backround and aims. Hypoxia at altitude may lead to mental changes resembling dissociative symptoms. This study examined whether hypoxia precipitates dissociative states in normal subjects and whether quantitative electro- encephalographic (EEG) changes occur.

Methods. Dissociative symptoms and EEG changes were examined in a hypobaric chamber.

Results. No dissociation was noted. EEG slowing accompanied hypoxia, replicating previous findings.


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